View while sightseeing over squamish with Sea To Sky Air

Day Trips From Vancouver: Taylor Meadows

In Squamish Activities by Vicky Farrand

Taylor Meadows is part of a very popular circle route in Garibaldi Provincial Park. In late summer and early fall, the ground in the meadows is ablaze with a carpet of bright wildflowers set against the backdrop of volcanic rock and snow-capped peaks. This area in Garibaldi Provincial Park is one of the most popular hiking day trips from Vancouver for people wanted to soak up the BC’s magnificent coast mountains.

The volcanism and tectonic activity that built this region has resulted in a beautiful array rock formations each with its own unique texture and colour. Combined with the wildflowers and giant glaciers, Taylor Meadows feels like an epic gateway to an outdoor enthusiasts paradise.

Day trips from Vancouver: How to get to Taylor Meadows

The trailhead to Taylor Meadows trail starts Rubble Creek, 24.6km south of Whistler. Following signs for the Black Tusk, hikes can continue through Taylor Meadows and on to the Barrier, Barrier Lake, Taylor Meadows, Garibaldi Lake and Battleship Islands. It is also the starting point for longer hikes to Panorama Ridge and the Black Tusk making it a great location for people looking for a multi-day trip from Vancouver or a scenic detour on the drive to Whistler.

Taylor Meadows hiking trail

The route to Taylor Meadows is a well-used, well-marked hiking trail. The trail meanders through the valley on a continuous upward trajectory, climbing to 1050ft. The trail’s gentle appearance in photos means that its continuous elevation gain is sometimes underestimated by beginner hikers.

  • 15 km (9.3 mi) round trip
  • 5-7 hours round trip
  • 1050 ft (3445 m) elevation gain
  • Intermediate
  • Camping available
  • No dogs

See Taylor Meadows and the Black Tusk from the air

For the last 170 million years, the North American and Oceanic plates have been colliding in British Columbia. The leading edge overrides the Oceanic plate at the fingernail-growing speed of four centimetres per year. British Columbia’s landmass is a collision zone of deformed volcanic islands, sea floor and North American continental margin. This magnificent diversity of landscape transforms the way you see Squamish and Whistler and is most clearly seen from the air over Garibaldi Provincial Park on or Whistler Backcountry Air Safari.

Book your Whistler Backcountry Air Safari here